What’s On Your Bucket List, Some Sweet Ladies, and some ‘healing’ books

jpeg-imag me and Kelly PEO

Kelly and me, at the PEO luncheon

Last Friday I had the opportunity to speak to the PEO (Philanthropic Educational Organization) women’s group at a church in Ferguson, Missouri. I was invited by author and friend, Deb Marshall and event organizer, Kelly Mazzacavallo.

After a lovely lunch of chicken and ham salad, the women gathered in a cozy lounge and settled in comfortable chairs to listen to me talk about “What’s on Your Bucket List” and the story behind my ‘healing’ coffee table book, Folly Beach Dances.

I shared with the ladies, that in preparation for the talk, hubby handed me a paper I gifted him a few years ago. The paper’s first words were “Do you remember when?” and reflected on all the crazy and unexpected bucket list items achieved in our travel adventures…like seeing the excitement in my husband’s eyes when we dove Bloody Bay Wall in the Cayman Islands, sailing a hobie cat from Sandals Negril to a deserted island, or even observing a ten-foot pregnant black tip reef shark on a dive in the Abacos.

Aptly named for the definition as well as the movie, The Bucket List, stars Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman. Complete strangers, fate lands the two men in a hospital room together. The men discover they have things in common – their desire for adventure, and a need to come to terms with their lives. After they are released from the hospital, they set out to check items off both their bucket lists.

At the end of the movie, Edward (the billionaire), living to age 81, has his ashes carried to the top of the Himalayas by his assistant Matthew. As Matthew gently places the container of ashes alongside Carter’s can of ashes, he takes a pen and crosses the last item off the Bucket List (which is to ‘witness something truly majestic’). Finally, Carter (Morgan) states, “I’m pretty sure he (Edward) was happy with his final resting place. Because he was buried on the mountain, and that was against the law.”

So, someone’s idea of a bucket list item, may be totally different than someone else’s.

That’s how it was for me when Folly Beach Dances was just an idea. In 2014, my idea came to fruition. I was able to cross ‘publishing a book’ off my bucket list.

As I spoke about the book’s mission of self-care, healing and positivity, the women listened intently.

I selected some of my favorite poems to read.

“Circle Dog Dance” written by Pat Wahler, reflects on three dogs laying in a circle on a beach relaxing, not a worry in the world.

“The Drifter” penned and photographed by me, reminisces about memories of days gone by and lazy days spent on the beach.

“The Fandango” – An old seagull (sporting grey hair on this wings, face, and body) who lives to fly, soar and dive, is penned by Marcia Gaye.

“The Twist”, about how often times life seems to be a mess of knots and twisted rigging (by Marcia Gaye). The Twist brought tears to the women’s eyes.

After time had run out, the women stepped forward to purchase books. I quickly ran out of Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits, my newest release, and Folly Beach Dances.

One woman stepped forward and shared how “The Twist” touched her heart, reminding her of a family member going through tribulations. We spoke for awhile, and I offered hopeful suggestions on how to make things better. Our conversation ended with a hug.

I thanked Kelly and Deb for allowing me to take part in this quiet gathering. The women where particularly sweet and seemed genuinely interested in my writing. My wish for the day was to stir some emotions, touch some hearts, and be positive.

IMG_1011 me and peo women

Peace, love and sand dollars,

Sheree

___________________________________

Sheree K. Nielsen is the author of 2015 Da Vinci Eye Award Winner, Folly Beach Dances; coauthor of Midnight, the One-Eyed Cat, and Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits – An Emerson-Inspired Essay Collection on Travel, Nature, Family and Pets.

 

Advertisements

Life on the Wall (Bloody Bay Wall) – Excerpt from Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits

Good morning everyone! I hope our neighbors due south are staying safe in preparation for hurricane Florence.

Today I’ll be sharing an excerpt from “Life on the Wall”, my diving adventure with friend Sheila and divemaster Zam, about the first time I cast a gaze on Bloody Bay Wall in the Cayman Islands.

Hope you enjoy!

“Keeping the wall as my visual landmark, I fin-kick and swim downward. Pressure builds in my ear canals. Pinching my nose with my thumb and forefinger, my cheeks puff as I force an exhale, clearing my ears.

I check my depth gauge, which now reads seventy-eight feet. Glancing to my right, I study the blue abyss. An immense Caribbean reef shark, sleek and gray, appears unexpectedly out of the chasm. I inhale deeply from my regulator, and hold my breath — an action forbidden in scuba diving. I quickly remember to exhale.”

Pink Azure Sponge, Devils Grotto GC copy copyr

“The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are truly adjusted to each other, who has retained the spirit of infancy even into the era of mankind.”

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Peace, love and sand dollars,

Sheree

 

Oysters and Pearls

Recently, I’ve been listening to Jimmy Buffett’s Encore 2 CD set of hits while taking the canine kids for drives around town, running errands, or heading to appointments. I’ve played this CD so many times, it has deep groves in the vinyl.

As I was singing along to “Oysters and Pearls” one afternoon, the chorus was stuck in my head.

(Chorus)

Some people love to lead
And some refuse to dance.
Some play it safely, other take a chance.
Still it’s all a mystery
This place we call the world
Where most live as oysters
While some become pearls.

(Chorus)

Some never fade away, some crash and burn
Some make the world go round, other watch it turn.
Still it’s all a mystery
This place we call the world.
Most are fine as oysters
While some become pearls

Hmm…Oysters and Pearls…

Haven’t some of us been both, at one point in our lives?

DSC_0843 pearls and shells adj copyr

When I won the Da Vinci Eye Award for my ‘healing’ coffee table book, Folly Beach Dances, in 2015, published by Ocean Spirit Photography, I felt like a pearl – so proud, so confident, to have collaborated with five talented Missouri women authors, my husband, and a wonderful designer, to ultimately publish this inspirational book of poetry and photography.

When I realized I wouldn’t be able to bear children, I felt like an oyster, even a failure. A deep chasm was left in my heart.

But quickly, I felt like a pearl again, when I was able to mentor a select group of youth at O’Fallon Christian Church for three years. And what awesome adults these kids have grown up to be – Riliegh, Sidney, Tyler, and Ben.

Some say the key to life is moderation. “You need to crack open the oyster to find the pearl.” (author unknown)

I like that a lot.

So maybe, in our own way, we’re oysters on the outside?

We don’t realize our own potential until we go out on a limb, take a risk, learn how to scuba dive, ride a horse, walk across a ranging stream to reach that waterfall, or whatever it is we crave to get excited about life….and you!

My little kitten, Ireland (aka Tater Tot), sure knows how to live life. She is pure joy! All I have to do is look at her, and the corners of my mouth upturn in a grin. Everything is an adventure for this fur baby. She loves chasing foil balls, talking to cardinals through the French doors, watching squirrels on the deck, stalking her brother from behind the footstool, trying new treats, and snoozing on my lap in the cool of the evening.

DSC_0835 Tater and squirrel copyr

But me…I’ve been playing it safe, except for vacation, when anything is possible.

Why is it for most of us, we hide in our bubble after arrive home from a vacation adventure?

Today, I’m going to make a promise to you, that I’ll try to take more risks in life.

DSC_0836 Tater and squirrel adj copry

I’m not sure where this adventure will lead, but I’m going to finish those writing projects that have been collecting dust, explore my local area, dance more, laugh more and be the tree hugger nerd that I truly am.

Hopefully, I’ll feel more like a pearl than an oyster…every day.

Care to join me?

Peace out and love,

xoxo

Sheree

The inspiring night sky – planets and nebulas – Oh my!

DSC_1584 moon in skyAt around 9 p.m. last night, hubby and I loaded up the back seat of the Equinox with two dogs, a tripod, camera, and flashlight.  We cruised down highway DD to Brommelsiek Park for the Friday night sky viewing hosted by the Astronomical Society of Eastern Missouri.

As we pulled into the pitch black parking lot, I noticed at least thirty to forty cars – a good turnout for the evening.

The Society meets Friday nights, beginning at dusk for an open house.  Astronomers set up their telescopes on paved areas, while visitors can get a glimpse of the night sky and ask astronomers questions.

Tonight was particularly breathtaking – the sky lit up like fireflies dotting the ink blue-black atmosphere.

Hubby found a designated concrete pad, and set up camera and tripod. I strolled around with my canine child and conversed with the astronomers.

First stop, I met Jim Trull.  His telescope was locked-in to a ring nebula.  A ring nebula blows off hydrogen (or expels gas) into interstellar space.  It’s a star that has collapsed and looks like a Cheerio when viewed through the lens of the telescope.

Next stop, I gazed at a fuzzy oval-shaped white mass called a Globula cluster.  According to Wikipedia, a Globula cluster is a spherical collection of stars that orbits a galactic core as a satellite.  Or you can remember it in simpler terms – a Globula cluster circles the galaxy like moths around a light, or pods around a plate.

At my last stop, I met John Sgouros.  His telescope sat low to the ground.  He used a Newtonian reflector (which uses a primary mirror, a secondary mirror and a reflector) attached to a Dobsonian mount.

I knelt on the ground and looked through the focuser to view Saturn, and its bright white mesmerizing rings. Off to the planet’s left, I located Titan – the fifteenth of Saturn’s moons, and the largest.  Incredible!

The viewing brought back good and bad memories of my college Astronomy class.  The fun part was learning about the night sky.  The hard part was remembering the chemistry.

I sauntered back to where hubby was relaxing on the concrete; faithful dog by his side.  His Galaxy Notepad app was set up for Google Sky.  Pointing his Notepad directly over our heads, the app identified all the stars, galaxies, and planets with their shapes and names in red.

A young couple with their son stopped by to see what we were doing. My husband explained to the boy how to use the app.  The boy thought it was pretty cool.  Upon leaving, I could hear him asking Mom if he had that app on his iPhone.

All in all, it was a wonderful evening.  It’s always good to learn something new, and dust off those cob webs about stuff you’ve learned and somehow forgotten.

And if you’re not busy, stop by Brommelsiek Park Astronomy Site, 1650 Schwede Road, Wentzville on a cloudless Friday night.  It’s free.

The Astronomical Society of Eastern Missouri is doing great things.