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There is No Such Thing as a Little Moment….

DSC_0114Walking through the house this week, I was reminded of a saying on a picture frame, “There is no such thing as a little moment.”

The moment in time, protected by pewter and glass, was captured at the St. Joseph, Michigan lighthouse jetty, early on in my marriage. It was a windy day, the sun was shining, and hubby and I were smiling ear to ear.

Each day, I am reminded that there are no such things as ‘little moments’.

When the dog does something silly like get wrapped up under the blankets, rendering it impossible to make the bed…20150325_094841 Sabrina copyr

When you walk among 4,000 Blue Morpho butterflies in flight at the Sophie Sachs Butterfly House, in Chesterfield, Missouri…

DSC_0095 blue morpho on bench copyr DSC_0100 butterfly  nancy crop

When you witness the sky change colors from orange, to blood red, to blue-gray while strolling the shoreline in Sunset Beach, North Carolina…

DSC_1492 sunset muted sky copyr

They’re really big moments, aren’t they?

So here’s to those moments, those fleeting bits of time, that lift us up wherever we are.

Those moments…knowing God is in our presence.

Happy Thursday and God Bless!

Xoxoxo
Sheree

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Life is Waiting…

Some of you might know me as a writer or photographer.  I am an artist, first and foremost.  And while I haven’t created a masterpiece in awhile, I draw inspiration from art and carry it over to my photography and penned works.

In college, I majored in Commercial Art.  One group of classes I especially enjoyed was Design.  So much so, I couldn’t wait to take this elective prior to the rest of my general subjects.

I whizzed through all three Design classes, and gathered valuable information along the way.

In Design I, I learned the basics – use of geometric shapes in a defined area, working with black and white, and more.  In Design II, I learned about creating logos, pixilated images, how balance and harmony play into design, and creating in 2d and 3d.

In Design III, with Monica Mason as professor and mentor, my fellow students and I went wild.  In this class, we learned to appreciate the abstract, the surreal, the sublime, while learning about color.

Even today, I reminisce about the fun and freedom I experienced in Monica’s class.

I remember her words of wisdom, “Design is what you want it to be.”

For the final, one student painted an acrylic on a huge life-size canvas; another classmate’s creation was smaller than his hand.

I began to appreciate and love the abstract.  During this time, I grew fond of architectural style.  (This will become evident in an article due out in Missouri Life, February 2013).

Recently, I tried my hand at design on a smaller scale with the help of my friend Dennis Guinn, a general contractor.

There was a small alcove on the wall to my basement.  An empty canvas of drywall, framed on three sides and a shelf on the bottom, it sat lifeless and neglected for more than four years.

I thought about filling it with mirrored tiles, but that was too ‘disco’.  I imagined it covered with stone, but that was too dense and cold.

That little alcove needed something magical.  A combination of ceramic, glass and stone tile seemed to be the right marriage.

I sketched my vision on paper, and with the help of Dennis (who did a grand job of placing, gluing and grouting tiles) came up with the masterpiece below.

My masterpiece

My masterpiece

And even though it took four years to finish this project, maybe that’s the way it was suppose to be.

So what’s stopping you from creating a masterpiece?

Life is waiting. Make it what you want it to be.

(First published – December 2012)

Four Things I Know

1) My dermatologist looks more like Harrison Ford every day.   He even has the eyeglasses down pat.

2) You learn patience quickly when you have a dog that is almost 18 years old.

3) It is impossible to sleep with a woodpecker drilling on your gutters.

4) Squirrels enjoy sitting on our driveway cracking nuts.

Beach Dances

“At the beach, we become like pieces of smooth multi-colored glass, washing away our sharpness and softening us around the edges.”

Sheree Nielsen, October 2010