The Dolphin’s Dance – A gift from Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits book release day

jb040702 (1) The Dolphins Dance Spot and Craig

Spot and Craig, photo copyright by Jason Belport

It’s book release day for Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits – An Emerson-Inspired Essay Collection on Travel, Nature, Family and Pets, and I couldn’t be more excited. In the coming days, there will be giveaways for free books and Starbucks gift cards.

Writing this book was a labor of love. It was a difficult decision which essays to include in the book. That’s where Trina Sotira came in. An early content editor, she organized the book into sections for me, advising what worked, and what didn’t. Although, I removed some of my favorite essays, there’s always another book to be penned.

So here’s a sneak peak at one of the best days in my life, the inspirational individuals, and special friends I met that unforgettable day.

This excerpt is taken from “The Dolphin’s Dance”.

“Following a second morning dive, Big Sister revved her engine, and steered a course to our afternoon site – The Wreck of the Kissimmee, a Cayman energy tugboat well past her prime, deliberately sunk in 1982 to aid in the reef system. As the boat killed her engine near the northern shore, we recognized a familiar face portside.

Spot had returned for an encore. I clapped my hands in delight. The dolphin patiently waited at the surface for our group to re-enter the ocean’s warm embrace.

We dropped quickly to the sea bottom, where visibility was excellent – as far as one’s eye could see. While exploring the wreck’s nooks and crannies, Spot lingered in the sand flats close by.”

If you enjoyed the sneak peak, you can order the book here or request it at one of your local bookstores. Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits includes complementary photographs and Emerson quotes for each essay.

Peace, love and sand dollars,

Sheree

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Life on the Wall (Bloody Bay Wall) – Excerpt from Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits

Good morning everyone! I hope our neighbors due south are staying safe in preparation for hurricane Florence.

Today I’ll be sharing an excerpt from “Life on the Wall”, my diving adventure with friend Sheila and divemaster Zam, about the first time I cast a gaze on Bloody Bay Wall in the Cayman Islands.

Hope you enjoy!

“Keeping the wall as my visual landmark, I fin-kick and swim downward. Pressure builds in my ear canals. Pinching my nose with my thumb and forefinger, my cheeks puff as I force an exhale, clearing my ears.

I check my depth gauge, which now reads seventy-eight feet. Glancing to my right, I study the blue abyss. An immense Caribbean reef shark, sleek and gray, appears unexpectedly out of the chasm. I inhale deeply from my regulator, and hold my breath — an action forbidden in scuba diving. I quickly remember to exhale.”

Pink Azure Sponge, Devils Grotto GC copy copyr

“The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are truly adjusted to each other, who has retained the spirit of infancy even into the era of mankind.”

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Peace, love and sand dollars,

Sheree

 

The Pillars of Hercules – Sneak Peak from Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits

This sneak peak below was taken from an essay I penned for Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits titled “The Pillars of Hercules” – a dive site off the craggy coast of Cayman Brac, teaming with tall pillar corals and magnificent macro life. Our divemaster and boat captain for our adventure was Craig Burhart – also unforgettable. He lead our group from Chesterfield Missouri (Y-Kiki Divers).

Here’s the excerpt from “The Pillars of Hercules”

“Donning my equipment over my sleek swimsuit, I jumped in giant-stride from the dive platform. The tepid water temperature felt invigorating on my skin. With only ten pounds in my weight belt, I dropped effortlessly to the sea floor. Russell followed close behind. The sun’s shadows danced on the rocky bluffs below the surface.

While drifting along the crushed seashell bottom, in the distance, I recognized the regal coral described by Craig. Tall butter cream pillar spires swayed softly and reminded me of bottle brushes, flourishing with banded butterflyfish and hogfish snappers. Close up, their bristles were actually polyp tips that opened and closed.”

26 The Pillars of Hercules, Pillar Coral with full view of banded butterfly copyr

Well, I hope that little teaser peaked your interest enough to visit my blog next Tuesday for a sneak peak at another essay.

For more about Ocean Rhythms Kindred Spirits – An Emerson-Inspired Essay Collection on Travel, Nature, Family and Pets click here. The book releases on September 25, 2018.

Peace, love and sand dollars,

Sheree

 

Silver Springs and the Summer of ‘61

One of the best things about summer as a kid, were family vacations with Mom and Dad.  Vacations allowed me to (1) be a free spirit, (2) explore, and (3) wade in the tepid waters of the Gulf or Atlantic, and sometimes tip-toe in the Great Lakes’ frigid waters.

Oh how Mom and Dad embraced Florida! From Jacksonville’s soft sand beaches and Aunt Mary’s crab boils, to St. Petersburg’s old forts, and Miami Beach’s Art Deco District. Mom and Dad loved it all.

Recently, I found a black and white photo of Mom and me posing on a concrete bench at Silver Springs, Florida.  A glass-bottom boat was the background scenery.  Mom and I wore matching white leather huarache sandals. I loved those sandals.  (My brown leather softies purchased as an adult, even outlasted my first marriage.

Mom and me- silver springs001I was eager to discover the underwater world at Silver Springs, a popular tourist attraction.  My white huaraches and I stepped foot onto a glass-bottom boat for a tour of the Silver River, lead by an official ‘Captain’.  With glistening views of the sandy bottom and sea shells, the day was unforgettable.

Shortly after I discovered the snapshot in my cardboard box of memories, I read a story the St. Louis Post Dispatch ran by Alan Youngblood of the Ocala Star Banner.

The exact same boats I remember in their heyday, appeared as the backdrop for the photo in the Post, with cypress trees, bushes and a park bench in the foreground.

copyright Ocala Star Banner

copyright Alan Youngblood, Ocala Star Banner

In the 1960’s the popular TV show Sea Hunt was filmed at Silver Springs, as well as countless movies. The attraction recently reopened as a state park. The article mentioned the glass-bottom boats are still a feature for park visitors.

Over the past year, millions were spent to preserve the springs with different anti-pollution projects.  Apparently, the water clarity disspated due to nitrates infiltrating the spring water.

I’m curious to see now, if the springs are pristine, clean and full of interesting fish and bird life — the way I remembered them as a child.

And I’d like to think that the same concrete bench — the one Mom and I sat on, decades ago – is still waiting for me….to make new memories.

(I’ll need to buy a new pair of huaraches for the trip.)

 

 

 

 

I am unique.

It was recently suggested that I decide on a ‘brand’ for my book of inspirational essays with lyrical introductory photos of which I am seeking representation.  As I pondered this idea, I’m not sure if I came up with a solution.

I am certain of who I am and what makes me unique..

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I love taking long walks on the beach, and searching for shells.  The motion and harmony of the people, nature, and the waves, stir up feelings I can’t explain.

The great rush of water on my neck, arms and legs as I jump giant stride off a diving platform in the deep blue gives me the biggest adrenalin rush.

I cherish all animals big and small – from the tiniest dragonfly in the last stages of life to the ten foot Caribbean reef shark I encountered while diving in the Bahamas with my husband.

There are no bad days at the beach.

Family is important, especially since mom and dad have passed on.  I love my brother and cousins unconditionally, and my Aunt Georgia, the matriarch of our family.  They never cease to amaze me.  I call my husband’s family my own.

I love the feel of a horse’s coarse mane running through my fingers, and their soulful eyes.

Interacting with people and developing relationships is important to me.  My long time friends and I have experienced life together – laughing, crying, analyzing.

I’ve weathered tropical storms. Island people have threatened my deportation.  I’ve endured traveler’s diarrhea.  I’ve picnicked on unsuspecting homeowners lawns.  I’ve been called names by little girls in the Turks and Caicos, and even flown over the Atlantic Ocean in a seaplane during a thunderstorm.  And I wouldn’t trade any of it.

There are no bad days at the beach.

My three-legged cat boy, my butter-eating black cat diva, and my neurotic Aussie Shepherd give me endless pleasure, comfort and laughter.

I enjoy learning about my ancestors – through Uncle Willie’s Farm, or through an online ancestry registry that leads me closer to my father’s heritage in Lithuania.

If I couldn’t travel, I would shrivel up like a prune.

My transportation modes have been many – helicopters, planes, trains, automobiles, golf carts, hobie cats, bogie boards, canoes, kayaks, live aboards, dive boats, cruise ships, and mask, fins and snorkel.  Faraway and familiar places are countless, and the memories are enough to last ten lifetimes.

I believe you can’t write a story without snapping a photo.  Pictures make the best memories.

I love that I married my best friend.

And there are no bad days at the beach.Image

“The Edge” published March 15 in “The Abaconian” – newspaper of the Abaco Islands

Please enjoy my essay about an encounter with a ten-foot reef shark in the Abaco Islands.  The photo credit is to Russell Nielsen, my husband, who fearlessly snapped the picture of the shark.

Click on the links below.  Essay is on page 11 and page 18 of the newspaper.

Mar 15, 2012 A 11 The Edge

Mar 15, 2012 A 18 The Edge