Author Highlight – C. Hope Clark

I first heard Hope speak at the Missouri Writer’s Guild conference a back in 2012. I loved the fact that she always smiled, and consistently wove positivity in her talks.

When I discovered Hope and I were featured authors at a booksigning at Columbia, South Carolina’s Irmo Branch Library in March, 2015, I suggested our husbands meet over dinner the evening prior to the event. After three hours of lively conversation on writing, vacations, dogs, and various topics, we almost closed down the restaurant. Looking around at nearby tables, we didn’t recognize any of the original patrons when first seated. We decided to leave the waitress a NICE tip.

This is the second author highlight on C. Hope Clark, I’ve done, and I admit, she is one busy woman. Hope her answers provide insight for authors everywhere.

 

1) Is it important for writers to help each other, and not charge for services – kind of a quid pro quo – as long as the writer has already developed a mutual relationship with each other?

I believe that writers naturally help each other, and it’s up to each individual to determine where that line starts and stops. At what point do we remain the professional and charge, and at what point do we give back? In this profession, there’s an assumption that writers are not supposed to get wealthy off their words. It’s supposed to be a sacrifice. I believe that a writer needs to set limits on the giving back or they’ll be sucked dry. But time is money in this industry, so each side has to respect that of the other.

 

2) If an author could concentrate on doing three things after their book is published, what would those three things be?

First – Never let one day go by without promoting the book somewhere.

Second – Start work on the next book.

Third – Keep an active chatter online about the book, it’s progress, appearances, reviews, etc. and that includes a newsletter.

 

3) What conferences nationwide could you recommend for the development of an author of any genre? Specific genres?

There are dozens and dozens of conferences each month. And each author needs to decide what they wish out of a conference before they select one. For instance, are they trying to pitch a manuscript? Then find one rich with agents and publishers taking pitches. Or are they working on craft and are a beginner? Or are they seasoned and need in depth work in a masterclass setting? Or do they want to rub elbows with other authors in their genre, necessitating a conference like Killer Nashville for mystery. Do they want a CON or a conference? Bouchercon is a fan-based conference as well as an educational conference. It’s huge, which begs another questions . . . does an author want to attend an event with 800 people or do they prefer something more intimate with 50? Do they want to go someplace exotic or tucked away in the Blue Ridge Mountains? Do they want to talk the business side of things or just craft?

As you can see, I’d have to list 50 conferences here to address everyone’s needs and even them would only cover one or two conferences per category. To find conferences, research WritersDigest.com (and then search “conferences”), Poets&Writers (https://www.pw.org/classifieds) , ShawGuides.com, then of course there’s the Association of Writers and Writing Conferences (https://www.awpwriter.org/wcc/directory_conferences_centers) .

 

4) How do you choose your book clubs, or do they choose you?

I scrounge for book clubs because most of them are very obscure and private, but I have to admit that they contact me. There is no one place to find book clubs because most don’t want to be found online. Libraries and bookstores know the local clubs and can make connections. But it also helps to have a book club section on your website. What makes landing book clubs difficult is the fact many book clubs go by bestseller lists in making their selections. Or from lists recommended on Goodreads.

 

5) How do you escape from your writing during the day? When you have writer’s block?

My escape is gardening, raising chickens, reading, and crosswords. My husband says I love reading anything and can’t stand not to have words in front of me. Maybe not that true, but I do adore reading, and I have books on my nightstand, near my computer, and next to my recliner. I can rarely just watch television. It has to be a superb show. Otherwise, I’m glancing at writing how-to books and mags, keeping a journal, or doing crosswords. But gardening takes me away from writing, but I still plot while pulling up weeds and tying tomatoes. And I make myself think about a chapter as I go to sleep at night. You’d be amazed at how many times I’ve awoken in the morning with an idea.

Writer’s block? Sorry, do not believe in it. We can always write. It might not be the project we want to work on, but we can write. I’m a believer in plowing through the tougher days of writing. If I am choosing to write for a living, then I am choosing to ignore writer’s block. I have to report to work. No other job lets you go home on those days you don’t feel like working.

 

BIO:Hope and Emily Grace (2)

C. Hope Clark’s  newest release is Newberry Sin. Hope is author of two award-winning mystery series, The Carolina Slade Mysteries and The Edisto Island Mysteries. She teaches writers at conferences nationwide and is founder of FundsforWriters.com, a website chosen by Writer’s Digest for its 101 Best Websites for Writers for the last 18 years. www.chopeclark.com

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